Tag: fashion

Domestic DJs

The live-streaming of DJs, singers and musicians at home has been one of the most widely used features across fashion brands, filling a void where social gatherings, festivals and club nights used to be. The choice of genre and star has been carefully considered to be in keeping with brand image and target audience, and on the whole the tracks have been up-beat showing a real sensitivity to public mood and the power of music to change it.

Playing Dress Up

Following on from our previous post Feel Good Fashion Generally speaking, we have seen four types of content from the fashion industry to accompany Instagram’s #StayHome tag: 4. Playing Dress Up A tactic which has been played by fast fashion brands more commonly than couture has been to highlight the role clothing and…

Arts and Crafts

In the last few weeks we have seen the emergence of art competitions like #McQueenCreators, a series of weekly projects including sketching iconic designs or life-drawing, alongside Lacoste’s #CrocoDraw challenge (so named as it requires recreating the icon by drawing or crafting), and Kenzo’s Wednesday Workshops.

Feel Good Fashion

Just as the global Coronavirus Pandemic has led to DJs flocking from clubs to the digital airwaves, it has also seen an innovative series of projects emerge from the fashion world; from high fashion to haute couture firms, writes Bex Taylor of BexEducation.com Fashion and wellbeing are two concepts rarely…

Let’s Get Physical

Karl Lagerfeld has been one of the few high fashion brands opting to this style workout, and has chosen to use Karl’s former bodyguard rather than a well-known figure in the fitness community. Shoe designer Alexandre Birman has provided an endless schedule of engaging content for each day including HIIT exercise classes alongside nutritionists, life coaches, meditation experts and holistic therapists to inform followers how to manage their stress and balance emotions at this difficult time.

Feel Good Fashion 6

The issue of ‘Smugsolation’ as coined by Glamour magazine, whereby idealistic images of quarantine lifestyles are plastered across social media, can add further pressures to those already feeling over-burdened.